Performance Calendar
Performance Calendar

Teaches

College
Historical Performance

About

David Schulenberg is a leading scholar of 17th- and 18th-century European music and an internationally recognized performer on historical keyboard instruments. A faculty member in the Historical Performance program since 2010, he also teaches at Wagner College on Staten Island, where he has chaired the music department since 2001. His publications include The Keyboard Music of J. S. Bach (second edition, 2006) and the textbook and anthology Music of the Baroque (third edition, 2013), as well as books on the music of Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (2010) and Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (2014) and editions of sonatas and concertos by C.P.E. Bach (2005, 2009, 2010), and organ works by J.S. Bach (2013, 2014).

Schulenberg can be heard as harpsichordist and fortepianist on five CDs of chamber music from 18th-century Germany on the Naxos, Hungaroton, and Albany Records labels. His research has been supported by grants and fellowships from the American Bach Society, American Council of Learned Societies, National Endowment for the Humanities, and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and he has chaired the Performance Committee of the American Musicological Society. He is a board member of the Boston Clavichord Society and served as its vice-president from 2008 to 2015. In addition to his writings on music by the Bach family, he has published materials on works by William Byrd and Johann Jacob Froberger; during the Froberger quadricentennial year (2016), he gave recitals and talks in Canterbury (U.K.), Hong Kong, Boston, and New York.

Born in New York City, Schulenberg grew up in upstate New York and attended Harvard. He studied piano with Stanley Hummel, harpsichord with John Gibbons and Martin Pearlman, and organ with Christa Rakich, receiving his MA in historical performance practice from Stanford University and PhD in music history from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Previous teaching posts include faculty positions at Columbia University, the University of Notre Dame, and the University of North Carolina, where he directed the Collegium Musicum.

He divides his time between New York City and the Boston area and during summers frequents the White Mountains of New Hampshire, where he completed the New Hampshire 48, having hiked to all peaks above 4000 feet in elevation, in 2015.