Evening Division
Summer Series

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One-Day Summer Intensive Courses

Spend a summer day enriching yourself at NYC’s Juilliard School with a one-day intensive course. The Juilliard Evening Division offers classes taught by distinguished faculty for adult students of all ages and abilities, which includes you!

Choose among a variety of topics, from Mozart’s Piano Concertos to the Life and Times of Louis Armstrong to the Music of Spain to Oklahoma! All classes are from 10am to 4pm (unless otherwise noted) and include a boxed lunch. Some courses feature in-class performances by Juilliard students, faculty, or notable guests, or tickets to a performance at Lincoln Center or on Broadway.

Browse full summer course listing below.

Special Offer

Register Online by May 30 to receive 10% off or print and mail a registration form.

Questions?

Contact us at evening@juilliard.edu

Courses Offered
 

Music History - Classical

Mozart: The Piano Concerto

Tuesday, June 4

American Piano

Thursday, June 6

Pictures at an Exhibition and the Craft of Orchestration

Thursday, June 20

Spain: A Confluence of Musical Traditions

Wednesday, June 26

Vivaldi: The Four Seasons

Monday, July 8

The Luminous Worlds of Dvořák, Kodály, Bartók and Shostakovich

Wednesday, July 10

Piano Transcriptions: New Interpretations of Existing Works

Thursday, July 11

Messiaen: Quartet for the End of Time

Monday, July 15

The Symphonies of Brahms

Tuesday, July 30

Music History - Jazz & Pop

Oklahoma!

Thursday, June 13

Common Tones: Classical and Pop Music Connections

Tuesday, June 18

Satchmo: The Life and Times of Louis Armstrong

Wednesday, July 17

Theater

Anton Chekhov: The Father of Modern Drama

Wednesday, June 5

Dance

Inside Juilliard Dance

Wednesday, July 24

Music Theory

Reading Music Boot Camp

Two Weeks [M-T-Th]; August 12, 13, 15, 19, 20, 22

 

Enroll Now

 


One-Day Intensive Summer Series

All courses are offered 10am-4pm (unless otherwise noted) and include a boxed lunch.


Satchmo: The Life and Times of Louis Armstrong

Reggie Quinerly

Louis Armstrong remains one of the most influential and highly regarded entertainers in the history of jazz and American popular music. His recorded output spans five decades and his electric stage performances made him one of the most celebrated cultural ambassadors of the 20th century. In this class, we retrace his earliest musical development, which begins very humbly in New Orleans. From this starting point we use biographical information, select articles, and recordings to discover the full scope of his journey. Along the way we encounter the likes of Bessie Smith, Bing Crosby, Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, and many others whom he influenced and collaborated with over the course of his incredible career.

EVDOL 081
Wednesday, July 17
$220


Oklahoma!

Faye-Ellen Silverman

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s first collaboration created a new approach to musical theater, one that influenced generations to come. This show, now celebrating its 75th anniversary, is still licensed for production hundreds of times per year. This course examines its evolution from the play Green Grow the Lilacs, discusses how it was a product of wartime America, tries to discern Rodgers and Hammerstein’s overall message, and looks at some of the songs that have become classics. We also examine the role of dance in the show. In preparation for seeing Daniel Fish’s revisionist revival of Oklahoma! that Time magazine rated #1 in its list of the 10 best plays and musicals of 2018, we discuss how much a show can or should be changed in light of the changing times.

EVDOL 074
Thursday, June 13
$265 Includes one ticket to the 7pm performance at Circle in the Square on June 13


Inside Juilliard Dance

Henning Rübsam

In a special collaboration with the Juilliard Summer Dance Intensive, the Evening Division offers a day of truly immersive dance experience. Learn Juilliard-specific dance history, tour the dance studios, and hear from Dance Division director Alicia Graf-Mack about her visionary outlook for the future of dance at Juilliard. Attendees have the chance to observe a dance technique class and get to hear about the creative process from a choreographer and former summer dance students. The course offers mentorship in how to create a short dance in a dance composition class and concludes by witnessing dance works performed by the summer dance students in a showing exclusively for the members of this Evening Division course.

EVDOL 075
Wednesday, July 24
$220


Anton Chekhov: The Father of Modern Drama

Carol Rocamora

Who is Anton Chekhov? Why is he considered one of the greatest dramatists of all time, alongside Shakespeare? In this class, we "meet" Anton Chekhov, the immortal Russian playwright, and learn all about his extraordinary life and times. We delve into the four great plays—The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, The Three Sisters, The Cherry Orchard—and explore why they ushered in the era of modern drama. We learn about his legacy and the many artists and writers he influenced, from Samuel Beckett to David Mamet to Tom Stoppard. The course includes numerous videos featuring actors from around the world performing scenes from these great plays.

EVDOL 078
Wednesday, June 5
$220


Vivaldi: The Four Seasons

Kendall Briggs

Perhaps no work of the Baroque is as well-known as Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons. Whether we know the name or not, this work is embedded in our everyday lives. Vivaldi’s music is found in movies and commercials, on the radio and online as background music—not to mention the countless videos and live performances of these classics. Yet many people do not know that these great concertos are based on sonnets written by Vivaldi, or that Vivaldi annotated the musical scores, marking which sound effects and events are to be heard in each bar. In this course, we unearth the treasures in each of the concertos and explore the background of why Vivaldi wrote these works. Complete scores are presented for each student to see and annotate as well as historical documents and analytic charts. The ability to read scores is strongly recommended.

EVDOL 073
Monday July 8
$265
Includes one ticket to Lincoln Center performance on July 26


Mozart: The Piano Concerto

Mirian Conti, Michael White

Mozart was a brilliant pianist, and he premiered many of his own concertos. In this class we concentrate on two of his most famous ones—Concerto No. 17 in G Major (K. 453) and Concerto No. 20 in D Minor (K. 466). We explore their musical structures, melodic materials, harmonies, rhythms, and orchestrations. Then we listen to live, in-class performances of the works in order to appreciate the power of the first movements, the lyrical beauty of the slow movements, and the wit and rhythmic excitement of the finales. The ability to read scores is strongly recommended.

EVDOL 077
Tuesday, June 4
$250


The Symphonies of Brahms

John J.H. Muller

When asked why he had not yet written a symphony, Brahms responded, “You have no idea how someone like me feels when he hears such a giant marching behind him all the time,” a clear reference to the symphonic legacy of Beethoven. The premiere of Brahms’ First Symphony after many years of work, in 1876, seemed to release an orchestral blockage, for in less than a decade, he wrote his other three symphonies as well as the Tragic Overture and Academic Festival Overture. The Mostly Mozart Festival has programmed the Third Symphony this summer, and we will survey all his symphonies with a focus on the Third. Emphasis is placed on a study of Brahms’s musical style, examining his debt to Beethoven but also the places where his approach to symphonic writing is very different from Beethoven’s. Brahms’ music truly shows his awareness of older and contemporary styles. The Third Symphony, with its extensive use of thematic recall and transformation, has often been connected to the techniques of Wagner and Liszt, and the Fourth Symphony concludes with a Baroque variation form suggestive of Bach but imbued with the qualities of the late 19th century.

EVDOL 084
Tuesday, July 30
$265 Includes one ticket to Lincoln Center performance on July 30


Pictures at an Exhibition and the Craft of Orchestration

Brad Balliett, Doug Balliett

How does a composer take a piece that exists in one form, like a piece for solo piano, and transform it into a full orchestral piece? There's no more famous example of this transformation than Mussorgsky's mammoth piano cycle, Pictures at an Exhibition, a beautiful tribute to a visual artist who died too young. Maurice Ravel famously transformed this piece into a frequently performed orchestral showpiece, but his is only the most famous among a number of fascinating orchestrations. The Brothers Balliett will guide class participants through a survey of the many orchestral versions of this piece, gleaning, along the way, many of the techniques and tricks used to turn piano music into music for the full orchestra.

EVDOL 079
Thursday, June 20
$250


Messiaen: Quartet for the End of Time

Kendall Briggs

Written in 1940-41 while Messiaen was a prisoner of war at Stalag VIII-A in Gorlitz, Germany, this quartet is one of the most important chamber works of the 20th century. Being a POW forced Messiaen to confront the meaning of life, both mortal and immortal, which is reflected in this monumental work. Elements of birdsong; eternal, circular rhythms inspired by Indian and Middle Eastern music; and non-Western scales and chords create some of the most sublime and moving music of the last century. In this course, we explore the background and meaning behind Messiaen’s masterpiece. Elements of the composer’s Catholic mysticism are revealed and we discuss how these beliefs helped to create his most famous work. This course helps prepare audiences for the Ensemble Connect performance of the Quartet for the End of Time on December 3 at Carnegie Hall. The ability to read scores is strongly recommended.

EVDOL 076
Monday July 15
$220


The Luminous Worlds of Dvořák, Kodály, Bartók and Shostakovich

Deborah Bradley-Kramer

Step into the diverse worlds of Antonín Dvořák, Zoltan Kodály, Bela Bartók and Dmitri Shostakovich and explore the vivid folk, political, literary, and other influences that shaped their musical languages. All three composers were steeped in the voices and sounds of ordinary people—the “folk”—and they celebrated the purity of those realms in poignant ways throughout their music. In this course, we focus on some of their most expressive compositions, highlighting the specific works to be presented at the Mostly Mozart Festival: Dvořák’s sparkling Violin Concerto in A Minor, Kodály’s haunting Dances of Galánta, Bartók's evocative Romanian Folk Dances, and Shostakovich’s droll Piano Concerto in F Major.

EVDOL 070
Wednesday, July 10
$220


Spain: A Confluence of Musical Traditions

José García-León

Spain has a range of musical traditions, from the bagpipes of Galicia and the accordions of the Basque country to the melodies of the canción española and the guitars of Andalucía. This class provides students with an overview of the main styles of Spanish music and their more relevant creators and performers, and it identifies the key roles that African, Middle Eastern, Caribbean, and Latin American music have played in the development of the music of Spain. Examples include Galician Celtic music (performed by Cristina Pato), Basque traditions (performed by Kepa Junkera), Spanish folk dances such as jotas and fandangos, coplas (canción española), zarzuela (Spanish operetta), and flamenco music (performed by Paco de Lucía and Camarón). Finally, we see how these traditions have inspired the classical music of Spanish composers such as Isaac Albéniz and Manuel de Falla.

EVDOL 083
Wednesday, June 26
$250


American Piano

Mirian Conti

American composers have been greatly influenced by the diverse cultures and styles of the immigrants who have come to this country. This one-day course is a survey of the known and forgotten piano literature of past and present American composers. They include Gottschalk, Joplin, McDowell, Dett, Griffes, Copland, Gershwin, Barber, Cowell, Adams, Glass, and Cage as well as current Juilliard composers. Special appearances and conversations with well-known composers enrich the class. Live and recorded performances are featured.

EVDOL 072
Thursday, June 6
$220


Piano Transcriptions: New Interpretations of Existing Works

José García-León

The body of music written for solo piano is full of transcriptions of works originally written for other formations—e.g., songs, arias, choral, orchestral music. Great piano composers from Franz Liszt to Sergei Rachmaninoff as well as legendary pianists including Vladimir Horowitz and Myra Hess have written a large number of them. Transcriptions were viewed as a way to make large works more accessible to a wider audience and also as a venue for pianists to share their own interpretations of these works with their public. In this class, we take a close look at several of the most significant piano transcriptions in their original versions and their piano adaptations. Works covered include Liszt’s versions of Schubert’s Ave Maria and Verdi’s Rigoletto; Rachmaninoff’s transcriptions of his own songs; Horowitz’s Carmen Variations, from Bizet’s opera; and Earl Wild’s solo piano version of the Gershwin brothers’ I Got Rhythm. This class features in-class performances by Juilliard College Division students to bring these works to life.

EVDOL 083
Thursday, July 11
$220


Common Tones: Classical and Pop Music Connections

Mitch Lyon, Mika Sasaki

Does 20th-century pop music have anything in common with western classical music? What does The Beach Boys’ Wouldn’t It Be Nice share with a Schumann song? Behind the differences in style and scope, we find common building blocks between these two seemingly disparate genres, and artists whose work broke down existing conventions, subverted audience expectations, and led us all down new paths of musical expression. In this class, we gain insights into form, harmony, and music's other essential ingredients by tracing groundbreaking techniques shared between the classical repertory and popular hits. We explore common characteristics between the styles through a selection of works by Schubert, Schumann, Bartok, and Steve Reich, among others, and the songs of The Beatles, The Beach Boys, ABBA, Elvis Presley, Prince, Adele, and other pop giants. In-class demonstrations and performances, audio selections, basic score analyses, and class discussions illuminate the common threads that give music power and meaning across genre and epoch. The ability to read and follow scores is strongly recommended, but not required.

EVDOL 071
June 18
$250


Two Week Course

 


Reading Music Boot Camp

Gregory Knowles, Melanie Williams

This intensive course teaches the basics of how to read music and is designed for those who have never tried to read a piece of music as well as those who need a brush-up from having read music previously. We discuss everything from the staff, clefs, notes, rests, and measures to rhythm, meter, time signatures, key signatures, and score reading. Students are given ample time to not only learn the music symbols but to also practice the skills and techniques necessary to understand and recognize the music they are looking at and listening to. For avid arts appreciators who want to dig deeper into the works they know and love (and better understand those they don’t) as well as practicing performers who want to be able to learn new pieces quickly and accurately, this class is your entry point for accessing the language of music.

EVDIV 051
Two weeks, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday
August 13, 14, 16, 20, 21, 23
5-7pm
$395

Secure your seat in a summer intensive course. No audition required.

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Danielle La Senna On Juilliard's Evening Division

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